Dear Tabby: My cat is PHAT!

Dear Tabby,

I have the most adorable, gray cat (certainly no bias). I am fully aware that he (name not disclosed for privacy reasons) is a “large” cat. I don’t intentionally overfeed him, however, I do believe he partakes from the food bowls of the other two cats in the house when he can get away with it. It’s also fair to say that even dog food doesn’t stand a chance in his presence.

But I digress. It’s not wrong to want to eat. So the problem is this: if I walk into someone’s house and I recognize that their child is “big boned,” I don’t say “Whoa, that’s a big kid!” So why do people feel it’s appropriate when walking into my house and laying eyes on my sweet, charming, treasure of a cat to say, “Whoa, that’s a big cat”? Or even worse, they ask, “Oh, is she pregnant?” It’s a HE! There are feelings involved here. Cats can understand our language.

Do I need to start looking into a Cat Whisperer to get to the deep-rooted issues that my gallant, handsome feline may be harboring?


Wish Others Understood Not to Disparage Extreme Distinctions

Dear Wish Others Understood Not to Disparage Extreme Distinctions:

As if your boy doesn’t have enough to deal with. Bet he can’t open a magazine or take in a movie without images of petite Persians and slender Siameses flaunting their figures.

Or… Maybe your cat has a sense of pride about his size. Perhaps to cats, significant girth suggests a life of plenty. He’s made it, man. No more scrounging for scraps on the streets. He’s king of this castle, his every wish is satisfied.

My guess, W.O.U.N.D.E.D, is that your full-sized feline doesn’t so much hear the words your visitors are using as much as he does the tone. And the tone that matters most to him is yours. So, if you’re giving him the attention and security (and wet food) he craves, he’s probably in good shape psychologically. As for good shape physically, you owe him your concern in that area as well.